options and pricing
Untitled-3aaaa-1-1
will pricing

Estate Planning Made Simple.

The comparison below will help you choose which type of estate planning documents best fit your preferences and the legacy you want to leave for your family and loved-ones

The comparison below will help you choose which type of estate planning documents best fit your preferences and the legacy you want to leave for your family and loved-ones

Untitled-4aaaaa
Untitled-4

LAST WILL & TESTAMENT

A “Last Will and Testament” is a legal document that, by state law, allows a testator (the person who’s Will it is) to allocate how he or she would like to distribute portions of his or her estate, such as cash on hand, real and personal property, and even digital property.   The laws applicable to the valid creation of a Last Will and Testament vary by state. (See Wills 101: The 5 "Ws" - Who, What, Where When, and Why).  This is one of the most common estate planning instruments available.  A Will can be used by itself or in combination with other estate planning instruments, such as a Trust (See Trusts 101: The 5 "Ws" - Who, What, Where When, and Why).

A “Last Will and Testament” is a legal document that, by state law, allows a testator (the person who’s Will it is) to allocate how he or she would like to distribute portions of his or her estate, such as cash on hand, real and personal property, and even digital property.   The laws applicable to the valid creation of a Last Will and Testament vary by state. (See Wills 101: The 5 "Ws" - Who, What, Where When, and Why).  This is one of the most common estate planning instruments available.  A Will can be used by itself or in combination with other estate planning instruments, such as a Trust (See Trusts 101: The 5 "Ws" - Who, What, Where When, and Why).

REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST

A “Last Will and Testament” will allow you to specify to whom you would like your assets to be distributed after your death.  It does NOT allow you any control over what these asset are used for once they have been distributed.  Rather than distributing assets directly to individuals, a “Revocable Living Trust” holds your assets for the benefit of whichever individuals you choose.  This allows you to specify control of property, use of property, age of distribution, acceptable uses for distributions, etc. (See Trusts 101: The 5 "Ws" - Who, What, Where When, and Why).

A “Last Will and Testament” will allow you to specify to whom you would like your assets to be distributed after your death.  It does NOT allow you any control over what these asset are used for once they have been distributed.  Rather than distributing assets directly to individuals, a “Revocable Living Trust” holds your assets for the benefit of whichever individuals you choose.  This allows you to specify control of property, use of property, age of distribution, acceptable uses for distributions, etc. (See Trusts 101: The 5 "Ws" - Who, What, Where When, and Why).

Last Will & Testament

  • Is not enforceable until your death
  • Becomes public record after your death
  • Must go through the probate process; except under some limited exceptions, beneficiaries do NOT receive access to gifts or assets until probate is complete
  • Any amendments require your signature and 2 witnesses
  • Does NOT require the transfer of any property or assets in your lifetime
  • You (personally) have no control over the use of assets that are distributed by your will

Last Will & Testament

  • Is not enforceable until your death
  • Becomes public record after your death
  • Must go through the probate process; except under some limited exceptions, beneficiaries do NOT receive access to gifts or assets until probate is complete
  • Any amendments require your signature and 2 witnesses
  • Does NOT require the transfer of any property or assets in your lifetime
  • You (personally) have no control over the use of assets that are distributed by your will

Revocable Living Trust

  • Enforceable immediately upon execution and funding
  • Terms of the Trust remain private, even after your death
  • May allow for expedited probate; beneficiaries gain access to gifts and assets immediately upon your death (subject to the terms of the Trust documents)
  • Can be amended with only your signature (as Trustee)
  • Require any property that is placed in trust to be legally transfer into the trust
  • You can generally specify when gifts are given and how they are used

Revocable Living Trust

  • Enforceable immediately upon execution and funding
  • Terms of the Trust remain private, even after your death
  • May allow for expedited probate; beneficiaries gain access to gifts and assets immediately upon your death (subject to the terms of the Trust documents)
  • Can be amended with only your signature (as Trustee)
  • Require any property that is placed in trust to be legally transfer into the trust
  • You can generally specify when gifts are given and how they are used

 

Other documents included in all packages

The 4 documents listed below are not add-ons, but are included as a part of each of the 4 Plans that we offer.  While you are not required to complete these additional documents, they are being made available because they are important documents for all individuals to consider having.

 

Other documents included in all packages

The 4 documents listed below are not add-ons, but are included as a part of each of the 4 Plans that we offer.  While you are not required to complete these additional documents, they are being made available because they are important documents for all individuals to consider having.

Which Type of Estate Plan is Right for you?

2a

A “Living Will” (which is a type of advanced directive) is an optional legal document stating that you DO NOT wish to continue receiving life support once it has been determined by qualified medical professionals that you will not continue to live BUT FOR life support.  If you choose to have a Living Will, you are choosing that the quality of your life is more important to you than the duration of your life.

(Specific definitions are provided for these legal terms in the Illinois Living Will Act).

A “Living Will” (which is a type of advanced directive) is an optional legal document stating that you DO NOT wish to continue receiving life support once it has been determined by qualified medical professionals that you will not continue to live BUT FOR life support.  If you choose to have a Living Will, you are choosing that the quality of your life is more important to you than the duration of your life.

(Specific definitions are provided for these legal terms in the Illinois Living Will Act).

pour over

A Pour-over Will” is the name for a Last Will and Testament with specific provisions that gift all of your remaining possessions to your Trust immediately upon your death.  Remaining possessions in this context means any items not already transferred or assigned through other legal means (such as an insurance plan with a named beneficiary).  A Pour-over Will is always created alongside of a Trust

A Pour-over Will” is the name for a Last Will and Testament with specific provisions that gift all of your remaining possessions to your Trust immediately upon your death.  Remaining possessions in this context means any items not already transferred or assigned through other legal means (such as an insurance plan with a named beneficiary).  A Pour-over Will is always created alongside of a Trust

4a

A “Financial Power of Attorney” is a legal document that allows you to select and authorize someone to act on your behalf in certain specified financial or property related matters.

A “Financial Power of Attorney” is a legal document that allows you to select and authorize someone to act on your behalf in certain specified financial or property related matters.

3a

A “Medical Power of Attorney” is a legal instrument that allows you to select the person that you want to make healthcare decisions for you if and when you become unable to make them for yourself.  Your agent is the person you trust to make health care decisions for you if you are unable or do not want to make them yourself. These decisions should be based on your personal values and wishes.

A “Medical Power of Attorney” is a legal instrument that allows you to select the person that you want to make healthcare decisions for you if and when you become unable to make them for yourself.  Your agent is the person you trust to make health care decisions for you if you are unable or do not want to make them yourself. These decisions should be based on your personal values and wishes.

helpful information & Resources

HELPFUL INFORMATION & RESOURCES